Believe It Or Not Dinosaurs Have Dandruff Too

//Believe It Or Not Dinosaurs Have Dandruff Too

Believe It Or Not Dinosaurs Have Dandruff Too


You may not believe it, but dandruff already exists even before humans came into being.

The first evidence that dinosaurs do have dandruff has been discovered. According to a new study, fossilized skin flakes have been found in the plumes of a four-winged Microraptor believed to be 125 million years old. These skin flakes evidently show that the winged dinosaur peels off its skin in small patches the same as the modern birds and mammals instead of whole or in big divides.

The scientists utilized an electronic microscope to examine the feathers from the Chinese samples of the Microraptor. They also include sample feathers of Beipiaosaurus, Sinornithosaurus, and the prehistoric bird Confuciusornis. Upon studying the feathers, they found corneocytes which are dead cells that develop the skin’s outer layer just like in modern birds and published it in Nature.

“We were originally interested in studying the feathers, and when we were looking at the feathers we kept finding these little white blobs, the stuff was everywhere, it was in between all the feathers,” according to Dr. Maria McNamara from the University
College Cork.

The sample fossils were borrowed from the Institute for Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology. Akin to human dandruff, the fossilized skin flakes consisted of firm flakes known as corneocytes and which is laden with a protein called keratin.

The findings expose some of the major details regarding the unknown era in the planet’s history when animals first develop feathers. The fossilized flakes suggest that as birds and dinosaurs first grew feathers millions of years ago, so do their skins to manage with the feature.

There is an imperative discrepancy between the old and today’s bird dandruff. The corneocytes in modern birds are loosely allocated among several intracellular fats. It helps to cool down the bird’s high temperature during flight. Prehistoric dandruff, on the other hand, is more substantially packed with corneocytes. This could suggest that the winged dinosaur’s skin need little cooling.

 


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2018-06-20T07:14:38+00:00

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